Student stories

  • "I am honoured to have received this scholarship from the University. It has not only been an immense financial help for my family, but it has also provided me with the ease of mind to pursue my Bachelor of Science to the best of my abilities. It truly means so much to me that I am following my passion at one of the most esteemed universities in the world on a scholarship."
    - Gautam Puri
  • Sophie Rasheed
    "From an educational perspective, studying in Germany, with its high educational standard, will provide an excellent opportunity to progress my skills in a language with which I’ve fallen in love. Plunging myself within the culture and country of the language is one of the most, if not the most, indispensable means of enriching my cultural understanding and skills for my German major. Thanks to the exchange program at the University of Melbourne, and now the amazing Anita Rodgers Scholarship, I will be able to continue to broaden my horizons, whilst fostering my journey of self-growth and discovery."
    - Sophie Rasheed
  • "I am both honoured and grateful to receive the Asia Institute PhD Scholarship. I am a middle-aged father of three children, so the financial assistance this scholarship provides is a necessity in order for me to undertake full time studies. My utmost commitment to excellence, and contribution to society, would not be possible without the aid of this scholarship."
    - Murie Hassan
  • Janneke Koenen, Master of Teaching student
    "This scholarship has been crucial in enabling me, as a single parent, to continue my studies this year, as without it, I almost definitely would have had to work to cover our living and school expenses (for both myself and my kids) and therefore I would have had to reduce my study load significantly. Perhaps most importantly, however, this scholarship has given me peace of mind, lessening the burden of worry, and thus enabling me to fully commit to (and enjoy!) both my studies and my kids."
    Read Janneke's story
  • Michelle Arrow
    "I was thrilled to have been shortlisted for the Ernest Scott Prize alongside three wonderful historians whose work I admire very much. I am honoured and delighted to have been chosen as the 2020 winner. This book had its genesis in my curiosity about the Royal Commission on Human Relationships, which was a ground-breaking inquiry into family and intimate life initiated by the Whitlam government. The Commission had been overlooked by historians to date (and forgotten by many who lived through the decade), but it offered a window onto the social change of the 1970s, and a new way to examine that history."
    - Michelle Arrow
  • Cristina Guarrella, Student, Doctor of Philosophy (Education)
    "If your research or professional goals are aligned with the spirit of these scholarships, absolutely submit an application! Consider and clearly articulate how your use of the scholarship funding supports you to achieve your goals while contributing to the core values of the scholarship."
    Read Cristina's story
  • Sienna Ahn, Student, Master of Teaching
    "My advice would be, enjoy what you do and be involved with appropriate passion. In my case, it was being part of my community and actively looking out for those in need of care and support."
    Read Sienna's story
  • Anastasia Betts, Student, Master of Teaching
    "As a young person at university, the demands of my caring role meant that I greatly missed out on a fair few leadership and volunteering opportunities that I was passionate about. Now, and with the financial support of the Jennifer Duggan Leaper Scholarship, I can take advantage of these opportunities."
    Read Anastasia's story
  • Sin Sin Ooi, Student, Master of Teaching
    "I hope that I can go back to my home country, Malaysia, to teach after I graduate, and hopefully I will contribute useful ideas to Malaysian schools (especially government schools) with the knowledge and experiences I have gained from this program."
    Read Sin Sin's story
  • Jessica Berthelsen-Murray , Student, Master of Teaching
    "During my final years at Wonthaggi Secondary College our Literature teacher took us on a trip to partake in some classes at Melbourne University to assist with our final exams. I remember how much I loved the atmosphere and it was always a place at the back of my mind."
    Read Jessica's story
  • Josh Cubillo, Alumni, Master of Education
    "We need Indigenous students to keep taking up these opportunities to show there is still a need for the financial assistance as we endeavour to take up tertiary studies and improve the socio-economic status of Indigenous people in Australia."
    Read Josh's story
  • Emma Murnane, Student, Master of Education
    "I don’t just enjoy it, I love it. I love the networking opportunities. I love meeting like-minded people and I love how the program supports our wonderful education system through current research."
    Read Emma's story
  • Thomas Devlin
    "I am grateful to be able to receive this prize. I come from a disadvantaged socioeconomic background, so this scholarship will go a long way in assisting me through my honours year, and in further helping me realise my academic goals. As well as making my living expenses easier, it also provides some opportunities to go further with my research if needed. This opens up a lot of opportunities for me. Taking the major has definitely helped me to consider non-western academic perspectives, and also to see the world in a more complex manner."
    - Thomas Devlin
  • Danyelle Bailey
    "Aboriginal Women and Coloniality’ was an exceptional subject led by the knowledgeable and passionate course coordinator Di Sandars. The subject explored my interest of history and power within the public place and landscape, through championing black women and role models. I’ve began to understand how Aboriginal women as artists, musicians, writers and political figures are transcending colonial power structures to continue to shape the places around us within contemporary Australia. Thank you for your generosity and support of the subject. I had an incredibly fun, often confronting but always thought-provoking experience."
    - Danyelle Bailey
  • "I cannot speak highly enough of the Charlie Perkins Scholarship. It changed my life. There were so many benefits from doing my D.Phil. in Population Health at the University of Oxford. It was home to the World Health Organisation Collaborating Centre for the Prevention of Non-Communicable Diseases, and I spent my days working with some of the brightest minds in the world in my field of study. I could tap into a global network of alumni, as well as the conveyor belt of amazing guest speakers visiting Oxford. Two-thirds of graduates were also from abroad, so I became more worldly, and I returned to Australia more ambitious with my personal goals. What’s more, it was just so amazing to be another student, an “Aussie” studying abroad, there on my own merit, without anyone second-guessing my worth because of my Aboriginality. In community, it can sometimes feel like the weight of the world is on your shoulders with all the expectation – not to mention community politics – and it was just so nourishing for my mind and soul to study abroad with such an incredible group of people. The Charlie Perkins Scholarship is one of the best things to happen in Indigenous Australian education in the last decade."
    - Dr Kyle Turner
  • "Having been the first recipient of the Einstein Fellowship for interdisciplinary thinkers, I was encouraged by a committee member to apply for a post-doctoral position at the Princeton Society of Fellows. The fellowship was a comfortable way to get acquainted with the U.S. academic system, to which I had not previously been exposed. The colleagues I met during my time at Princeton have remained a constant source of inspiration for my work, and some became close friends."
    Read Dr Mischa Gabowitsch's story
  • "The AAUW’s International Fellowship enabled me to study a Master of Laws at Columbia University in New York. That degree was a springboard, helping me to secure work in law firms in New York and London where I was able to apply my studies in a practical context across a range of cases. Studying for the LLM in New York also instilled a love of learning, which led me to do a further Masters in Melbourne. All of that experience has helped me at the Bar, where I am able to “give back” through balancing pro bono work with other matters. I can’t stress the importance of the AAUW’s fellowship as a critical part of the foundation of my legal career."
    Read Rachel Amamoo's story
  • "Imagine knowing you could make a difference to your community, while also knowing you didn’t have the skills to affect that difference. Then imagine winning a scholarship that allowed you to go attend a prestigious university and get intensive academic and personal mentoring that gave you not only the skills, but the confidence and ability to use them. This is my experience of the Roberta Sykes Award. It allowed me to attend Oxford University and gain a MSc in Evidence Based Social Intervention and then go to complete a research PhD at the National Centre of Indigenous Studies at ANU. Currently, I am the inaugural Professor of Indigenous Health at the School of Medicine at WSU as well as leading a research team at Maridulu Budyari Gumal, an organisation of 14 research institutions across Sydney. I know I have made a difference to Aboriginal health and education. I know it’s because of the Scholarship I received at the University of Melbourne, and the Roberta Sykes scholarship, that allowed me to attend Oxford University. I am forever grateful."
    Read Prof. Aunty Kerrie Doyle's story
  • "The Rhodes Scholarship allowed me to pursue my interest in public policy and technology by studying a Master of Public Policy and MSc in Social Science of the Internet at the University of Oxford. My time at Oxford was extremely rewarding and empowering, on both a personal and professional level. In particular, it led to my involvement in various student initiatives to improve accessibility at the University of Oxford, to my founding of a tech startup empowering social inclusion for disabled people through better accessibility information, and to my growing professional interest in the related fields of tech for good and ethical AI. With the support of the Rhodes Scholarship, I have been able to pursue my passions and turn them into promising career pathways."
    Read Matt Pierri's story
  • "A Commonwealth Scholarship gave me the opportunity to undertake a doctorate in modern history at Balliol College, Oxford from 1997 to 2001. My research focuses on the interpersonal networks that sustained Britain’s nineteenth-century empire, so studying at the University of Oxford meant joining a cosmopolitan community of postgraduate students and faculty working in the same field, while enjoying access to the archives and libraries that were central to my research. My first book, Colonial Connections 1815-1845, emerged from my doctoral research, as did a lectureship at the University of Sheffield, and then a position at Royal Holloway, University of London. The influence of the work I did in Oxford is still clear in my more recent work on settler colonialism, imperial governance, humanitarianism, and indigenous responses to empire. In 2018, I returned to the University of Melbourne to work in the School of Historical and Philosophical Studies."
    Read Prof. Zoë Laidlaw's story
  • "After graduating from the University of Melbourne, I received the BHP Australia China Scholarship for my postgraduate studies at Peking University. This scholarship supported me to deepen my understandings of contemporary China firsthand while undertaking coursework and defending a dissertation on the implications for Australia of Chinese aid donations to the Pacific Islands. The scholarship also connected me with a network of likeminded individuals within the Australia-China community with whom I have been able to learn from and challenge myself. Through the scholarship I was able to attend the Australian Studies conference held in Chengdu, an experience that connected me with prominent academics in the field. Overall, the scholarship has not only supported me financially, but allowed me to engage more deeply with the people and issues that will shape the future of Australia-China relations."
    Read Annabelle Jarrett's story
  • "The Branco Weiss fellowship provided me with the freedom and independence to focus intensively on my research for a prolonged period, a very rare prospect in most academic jobs. In particular, among the many benefits of this fellowship is the opportunity for mobility. I used the flexibility of this fellowship to develop my research program on seafood trade throughout the Asia-Pacific, spending extended stays in China and Malaysia to work with collaborators at Peking University and WorldFish. The support provided by the fellowship was crucial in allowing me to initiate and maintain such long-term collaborations."
    Read Dr Michael Fabinyi's story
  • "Funding from the British Academy (jointly with the Royal Society through the “Newton International Fellowship”) provided invaluable support for my investigation of the combustion of second-generation liquid biofuels at the University of Cambridge. The stipend, travel and equipment funding enabled me to kick-start my independent research career and, as a consequence, I was hired by Rolls-Royce, where I led their Industrial Gas Turbine Research and Technology Team. The British Academy’s generous alumni program enabled me to maintain research collaboration with UK academics long into my career, leading to a patent on a novel low-emissions Gas Turbine combustor with Rolls-Royce and Cambridge."
    Read Dr Robert Gordon's story
  • "My primary research focuses on the use of brain stimulation (TMS, TES) and brain imaging techniques (fMRI, MRS, MEG) to understand cognitive control, attention and awareness in the human brain. In addition to my core research programme in cognitive neuroscience I also pursue interests in the relationship between science and the media, the role of science in shaping evidence-based public policy, and the promotion of open research practices. The David Phillips Fellowship greatly benefitted my research as it provided support to establish a research group. The fellowship provided a foundation upon which I was able to develop my research, for example by jointly establishing collaborative projects in research teams. These recent research-led initiatives identify causes of error in the translation of science to the news and will facilitate interaction between academia and politicians in the service of evidence-based policy."
    Read Prof. Chris Chambers's story
  • "There is no way to overstate the impact that the John Monash Scholarship had on my life. It permitted me to undertake my Master of Fine Arts studies at the University of California, Los Angeles in the Interdisciplinary Studio program. During my time there I have had the opportunity to study with some of the leading visual artists practicing today including Mary Kelly, Barbara Kruger and Andrea Fraser. Being part of the community at UCLA has also enabled me to create incredible networks with peers and visiting professors that has inordinately furthered my career in the field of art, make the transition from lawyer to artist, and contribute to the growing field of legal aesthetics."
    Read Shevaun Wright's story

Previous | page 1 of 5 | Next

Interested in a scholarship? Register now

Get more on scholarships and other information to help you succeed at the University of Melbourne.

International: +61 3 9035 5511

For complete listings of faculty-specific scholarships, please see individual faculty websites.